News on CyberKnife - Cancer Treatment at Southeast Georgia Health System

News on CyberKnife - Cancer Treatment at Southeast Georgia Health System

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1-800-537-5142 ext. 5149.

Southeast Georgia Health System joins the ranks of the world's most advanced cancer fighters with its new CyberKnife® System

Winter 2011 - What do you call a treatment to remove cancer that can be performed without scalpels, stitches or anesthesia? A great new option, says Timothy A. Jamieson, M.D., Ph.D., a board-certified radiation oncologist with Southeast Georgia Health System who is among a growing number of cancer fighters performing this non-invasive procedure. The new tool he uses that’s revolutionizing cancer care is called CyberKnife®, the world’s first robotic radiosurgery system designed to treat tumors anywhere in the body without making a single cut.

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CyberKnife® Official News Reel

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CyberKnife® "valid option" for low-risk prostate cancer: study

January 13, 2011 - A follow-up study using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation for low-risk prostate cancer found most patients had disease-free survival after five years, with little toxicity, results that researchers say could help bolster support for the treatment.

"In our mind, it's no longer investigational or experimental therapy," study co-author Dr. Debra E. Freeman, a radiation oncologist with CyberKnife Centers of Tampa Bay in Florida, told DOTmed News. "It's a valid option in the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer."

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System Takes Positive Step to Maintain Health

December 3, 2010 - Southeast Georgia Health System is making a giant investment in the community and in the health of its people. It will soon offer one of the most technologically advanced weapons in the fight against life-threatening tumors and cancer: CyberKnife.

The accuracy of the robotic device, installed at the Caner Care Center at the Brunswick hospital Tuesday, in unrivaled in its accuracy in delivering radiation directly to invading cancer cells.

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Hospital Has New Cancer Weapon

December 2, 2010 - Cancer patients in Southeast Georgia will have access to high-dose radiation treatment with pinpoint accuracy when a new robot radiotherapy machine is put into use at Southeast Georgia Health System.

The $4 million CyberKnife system - only the second in the state - uses a robotic arm to treat tumors found anywhere in the body by delivering from 100 to 200 radiation beams from multiple angles. During treatment, X-ray cameras provide physicians with instant feedback on the movement of a patient or tumor for accurate targeting.

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CyberKnife® Comes to Southeast Georgia

Fall 2010 - Many area cancer patients will soon have the option of having their tumors treated using a painless, noninvasive procedure. In June 2010, the Georgia Department of Community Health approved Southeast Georgia Health System’s Certificate of Need (CON) application to obtain the CyberKnife System—the world’s first robotic radiosurgery system designed to treat tumors anywhere in the body without any cutting involved. Final installation preparations are now underway, and Health System officials expect to have the system in place and operational by the end of January 2011.

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Hospital to Get Tumor Treatment Robot

BRUNSWICK, Georgia: June 22, 2010 - Southeast Georgia Health System’s hospital in Brunswick will soon be one of only two in the state to offer CyberKnife® technology, a robotic radiosurgery system designed to treat tumors without cutting a patient. The health system said the Georgia Department of Community Health approved its Certificate of Need request to offer the CyberKnife®. It should be installed and operational at the hospital in November. "Currently, there are only about 200 CyberKnife® systems in the world and until our CON was approved, the only one in Georgia was at Wellstar Kennestone Hospital in Marietta," radiation oncologist Timothy A. Jamieson said.

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