Hospital Compare

Hospital Compare allows consumers to select multiple hospitals and directly compare performance measure information related to heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, surgery and other conditions. These results are organized by:
  • Patient survey results
  • Timely and effective care
  • Readmissions, complications and deaths
  • Use of medical imaging
  • Linking quality to payment
  • Medicare volume

Readmissions

Patients who are admitted to the hospital for treatment of one medical problem sometimes get other serious injuries, complications or conditions, and may even die. These events can often be prevented if hospitals follow best practices for treating patients. 

What is this, and why is it important? 

  • The rates of unplanned readmission focus on whether patients who were discharged from a hospital stay were hospitalized again within 30 days. Patients may have been readmitted back to the same hospital or to a different hospital. They may have been readmitted for a condition that is related to their recent hospitalization or for an entirely different reason.
  • Rates of unplanned readmission show whether a hospital is doing its best to prevent complications, provide clear discharge instructions to patients and help patients make a smooth transition to their home or another setting like a nursing home.
  • The hospital readmission rates are based on people with Original Medicare (traditional fee-for-service Medicare) who are 65 and older. The heart attack, heart failure and pneumonia unplanned readmission measures also include patients aged 65 or older who were admitted to Veteran's Health Administration (VA) hospitals. These rates are calculated using Medicare enrollment and claims records, and a complex statistical procedure known as hierarchical logistic regression modeling. The readmission rate is risk-adjusted, meaning that the calculations take into account how sick patients were when they were first hospitalized. Risk-adjusting the readmission rate helps make comparisons accurate and meaningful, especially for hospitals that treat sicker patients.
 
View the Health System's Hospital Compare Readmissions data by clicking on the link below:
 

Healthcare-associated Infections 

Healthcare-associated infections, or HAIs, are infections that people get while they're receiving treatment for another condition in a healthcare setting. HAIs can occur in all settings of care, including acute care hospitals, long term acute care hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, surgical centers, cancer hospitals and skilled nursing facilities. Many of these infections can be prevented through the use of proper procedures and precautions. Lower numbers are better. A score of zero (0) is best. 
 

What is this, and why is it important?

Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infections


Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections

  • A catheter is a drainage tube that is inserted by a doctor into a patient’s urinary bladder through the urethra and is left in place to collect urine while a patient is immobile or incontinent. When not inserted correctly or kept clean, or if left in place for long periods of time, catheters can become an easy way for germs to enter the body and cause serious infections in the urinary tract. These infections are called catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), and they can cause additional illness or be deadly. CAUTIs are mostly preventable when healthcare providers use infection control steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • This measure compares the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in certain locations in a hospital to a national benchmark.


Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) Blood Laboratory Identified Events

Bloodstream Infections

  • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is a type of bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics. MRSA infections in the bloodstream can be caught in hospital settings, and may cause severe or life-threatening symptoms.
  • Hospital staff can prevent MRSA from being transmitted to patients by taking certain precautions, like washing hands; using protective gloves and gowns; sterilizing equipment between patients; covering the mouth, nose and eyes when appropriate; and practicing responsible use of antibiotics. Responsible use of antibiotics includes limiting the dosage to only what is needed to combat the infection, and avoiding the use of more powerful antibiotics when a narrow-spectrum antibiotic will work.
  • Symptoms from MRSA infections often take a few days to develop. Patients are tested for MRSA bloodstream infections if they show signs of illness while in the hospital. This measure compares the number of MRSA-positive blood specimens collected 4 or more days after the patient entered the hospital to a national benchmark.

Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) Laboratory Identified Events 

Intestinal infections
  • Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) is a type of bacteria that causes inflammation of the colon. C. diff. infection can cause severe diarrhea, fever, appetite loss, nausea and abdominal pain.
  • Hospital staff can prevent C. diff. from being transmitted to patients by taking certain precautions, like washing hands; using protective gloves and gowns; practicing responsible use of antibiotics; covering the mouth, nose and eyes when appropriate; and sterilizing equipment between patients. Responsible use of antibiotics includes limiting the dosage and length of treatment to only what is needed to successfully combat the infection, and avoiding the use of more powerful antibiotics when a narrow-spectrum antibiotic will work.
  • Symptoms from C. diff. infections often take a few days to develop. Patients are tested for C. diff. infections if they show signs of illness while in the hospital. This measure compares the number of stool specimens that tested positive for C. diff. toxin 4 or more days after the patient entered the hospital to a national benchmark.
View the Health System's Hospital Compare Infections data by clicking on the link below: